Tag Archive | agnishatdal

AGNIJASHATADALAMA PAYPAL AND PATREON- THE NEXT STEP by Sharmishtha Basu

Well, I finally decided that it will be but intelligent to create an online store for my works, that will help me in selling Agnijaat, Agnishatdal and my other creations in future.

Mostly you will see the sample books in agnijashatadalama, and announcements of my Amazon and Patreon projects, but, any sample book you see there, if you want to buy a pdf of its style (with far better contents) you know the email id to contact, or you can hop over to Patreon and become my patron there! That will be more trustworthy for you I believe. You will see me there every month with new works and I sincerely wish to see you too!!

So, here they are for you- just the foundations, if you feel like it suggest me, anything you want! If you want to display your books/works let me know. You know my email ids: sermistabasu@gmail.com and agnijaat@hotmail.com

now the urls of Agnijashatadalama:

https://agnijashatadalama.wordpress.com
https://agnijashatadalama.blogspot.in
https://www.facebook.com/agnijashatadalama

I will be waiting for your comments!
Wish me luck and join me there!

If you want to encourage the struggling artist and writer with your huge-hearted generosity:
https://www.paypal.me/sharmishthabasu
https://www.patreon.com/sharmishthabasu

You will be able to buy the Ezines, and my other digital works, some are already up in Patreon, will be there regularly- every month, others are available in Agnijashatadalama, where you can see the samples, directly approach me and I will send you the pdf files after you pay through paypal!

Troy Wednesdays 23.8.17 Christopher R. Rice Interview

Focus on the Author: Christopher R. Rice Interview

Full disclosure: Christopher is a friend whom I’ve known for years and has done a lot of great writing and GMing for our gaming campaigns. So this interview, conducted by email correspondence, will be the first installment of this series of posts. I’ll include many other writers in it as well. Enjoy!

Troy: So, Chris, tell us about your magazine articles and any books you’re working on or
had published.
Christopher: I’ve written quite a bit of gaming material for Steve Jackson Games (at last count 47 articles, a book, and numerous supplemental material appearing in books I didn’t write). I’m currently proposing another (gaming-related) project, working for a nascent publishing company as an indexer, starting the beginning of a series of urban fantasy fiction novels, and another project I can’t talk about at all.

Over the years, I’ve written a lot of ghost content for various magazines, blogs, and gaming engines. Odd, because I got my start as a poet (I won something like $11,000 dollars from age 10 to age 16 for my poetry in various publications).

Troy: What was the turning point that led you to become a writer?
Christopher: I almost died. No, seriously. In early October 2011, I almost died due to complications of severe septicemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. The first was from a systemic infection in my right leg by MRSA and the second was due to the infection triggering my latent Diabetes (I’m a type 1 and thus dependent on insulin). I only wanted four things while I was languishing in the ICU: 1) to live and get out of there; 2) to get healthy and exercise more; 3) to become a writer; 4) to drink Orange Crush until I peed pumpkin. I did 1, 3, and 4 – still working on 2.

I actually started writing seriously because my family needed the money at the time. Imagine my shock when it kind of became a career. That’s when I started taking it seriously. I started my blog soon after and then began to work on the skills I’d need to continue in my chosen profession.

Troy: What were your major influences, and who and what are your top 5 inspirations?
Christopher: Wow. There is so much. I’m going to break this down to personal inspirations and popular culture inspirations.

1) My other half. Seriously. She’s amazing. I don’t think I could write without her.

2) A man named Donald Johnston – my “foster” dad. I remember asking him what he thought about me being a writer about 7 years before I started doing it seriously (only 2 years later he died). He replied with this gem: “Is it a passion? Does the idea of being a writer fill you with fire? If so, follow the burn.” Simple. But moving. That was him all over.

3) My mother. My mother would have liked for me to be a scientist or something else, but she saw in me a talent for writing and observing the fantastic and urged me to continue writing.

4) My friends. I don’t have many, but they are supportive and never ever let me feel less than up to the challenge. I’m lucky like that.

5) My fans (what few I have) and pretty much for the same reasons. They really keep me going.

Troy: What are your thoughts on the writing process, and your favorite things and pet peeves on it?
Christopher: I’m kind of weird when it comes to writing. I just kind of decide to do something and then it gets done. The “process” is different for each writer and I won’t give any advice on it other than just never give up.

I’m terrible about the editing process. I’m better than I was six years ago, but nowhere I need to be. I continue to try to better myself, but even being an autodidact there is so much to learn about the English language. I have a mentor/teacher/friend (Elizabeth McCoy) who helps me so that’s also a bonus.

My favorite part of writing is taking the thoughts from my head (ephemeral electrical impulses) and putting them into something real, solid, and concrete. Something others can see. That’s just magic to me.

Troy: If you weren’t a writer, what would you have been, what pursuit or profession?
Christopher: When I was a boy I wanted to be a scientist (probably a geologist or chemist, I’ve a penchant for both fields). I’ve got what you might call “guardian” tendencies so I might have ended up in security, law enforcement, etc. No matter what I would have done I would have done it to the fullest extent of my ability. Duty to one’s profession is something of a code I live by.

Troy: You like to cook, often yummy Indian food, but without precluding any nationality, what’s your favorite dish to eat, and your favorite to cook?
Christopher: Hmmm. Favorite food to cook, gosh. That’s hard. I like complex recipes that take time, skill, and effort to prepare because cooking is sort of Zen for me. There’s this list of instructions and following it requires little in the way of brainpower. It lets me think about other things (often stumbling blocks within my work). I’d have to say the most complex thing I’ve cooked to date is beef bourguignon served with a spinach and gruyere cheese soufflé.

What do I like to eat? It’s a toss up between my mother’s homemade fried chicken and my other half’s beef stew. I could eat my weight in both.

Troy: What are some of your favorite places, and what would be your dream
destination? Why?
Christopher: I don’t get out much now, but I used to be a fairly avid hiker, rock climber, and outdoor enthusiast. This is something I’d like to change in the coming years if I can.
I like being outside. I also like to be in places where I can be fully alone; I tend to prefer being alone sans the company of a few individuals in my life.

I’d be at peace in the mountains, by the sea, or forest in the middle of no where – as long as I had access to the internet.

Dream destination would probably be the Maldives, Rocky Mountains, or in general somewhere up north. I like the cold and I like just being by myself so all that fits for me.
Besides gaming, and GMing GURPS campaigns, what hobbies and pastimes do you enjoy when not working on something?

I read. A lot. Usually between 1.5 to 2.5 books per day. I love to carve and whittle, but it’s been a while for both. I also consume a lot of popular culture like TV, movies, etc.
mostly because I have issues sleeping. I’d probably have gone mad by now without the advent of On Demand technology. I love to cook as it relaxes me and gives me something to do at the same time. I also enjoy writing poetry on occasion, but it’s mostly for myself. Therapeutic in a way. I tend to get philosophic around 3am (no idea why) and that leads me to questioning, well, everything. I do enjoy thought exercises and I’ve been known to just stare off for hours thinking.

Troy: How do you deal with life’s difficulties? What life lessons have you learned from your experiences, or survival tips to pass on to the readers?
Christopher: I try to take things a day at a time (sometimes an hour at a time if everything is on fire like it seems to be lately). I concentrate on the things I can fix and do my best to be aware of, but ignore everything else.

I’m bi-polar so this is really hard, but I’ve literally spent 13 years using various practices, meditative techniques, and breathing exercises to allow me to keep my emotional state.
Combined with my medications I function almost normally (as long as I can get breaks – another perk of being a freelance writer).

TL;DR Don’t sweat the small stuff. It’s all small stuff.

Troy: What’s your current favorite quotation, and overall favorite quotable person, real or fictional?
Christopher: There is a series of books by David Wong – the first being “John Dies at the End” –which are quite excellent. Don Coscarelli directed a movie version in 2012 with a quote I rather like about insanity and perception of reality.

“Dave: What do you think it’s like, Father?
Father Shellnut: What’s what like?
Dave: Being crazy, mentally ill.
Father Shellnut: Well, they never know they’re ill, do they? I mean, you can’t diagnose yourself with the same organ that has the disease, just like you can’t see your own eyeball. I suppose you just feel regular, and the rest of the world seems to go crazy around you.”

– John Dies at the End (2012)
I remember being a quite bitter and angry youth and asking my foster dad a question which he took the time to answer: “Nothing I do matters so what’s the point?”

“If nothing you do matters then the only thing that matters is what you do. You have a choice, you can choose to be angry, bitter, and full of hatred and self-loathing and tear down everything around you or you can use your pain to build everything up around you.”

That really stuck with me. I mean really stuck with me. I’m remind of those words every day of my life and I try to live by them.

Troy: If you were to strike it filthy rich virtually in a night, verging on being a trillionaire, what would you do with the money?
Christopher: Too much. It boils down to making sure my countrymen have healthcare, fixing some of our social intuitions, etc. I’d provide for all my friends and loved ones in some many and generally invest in the future of the planet. I know that makes me sound like some hippy-dippy do-gooder, but that’s what I’d do. There’s only so much money you need.

Troy: So, I’d like to establish a precedent for these interviews, attributing its origin to Cara Santa Maria of the Talk Nerdy podcast, to wrap up with a double question, so, What current trends and events most tempt you toward pessimism of things to be?
Christopher: “A pessimist is an optimist with a sense of history.”

The apathy of man and the general lack of critical thinking and asking the big questions among the populous. I cannot personally stand the willfully ignorant in any capacity and it tends to angry up my blood when I see someone who fits the bill. Ask questions!

(Respectfully) defy authority! Hold others accountable! Be personally responsible. The lack of personal responsibility is something that deeply disturbs me.

Troy: …and on a much lighter note, what gives you the most hope toward what the future holds?
Christopher: Not much. But I still hold hope. It’s a foolish, optimistic hope. The best kind. I believe that in the end people will do the right thing – and not just for them.

I remember something my grandfather told me once: “A man goes out into the storm and he has a lantern. The rain is pelting him in the face and he’s sheltering the lantern with his body when he comes across another man who stands shivering in the dark and cursing his fortune. He asks the man what’s he’s doing. The man replies ‘I am lost and my lantern has gone out.’ So the man with the lit lantern pulls the candle from it and lights the other man’s candle knowing full well that the rain could extinguish it and leave them both in the dark. But by some miracle the fire is shared and the lost man is helped home. Was the man foolish for risking his own candle? Brave for facing the storm?

Something else? To put it another way: Is it better to curse the darkness or to light another’s candle?”

Troy David Loy is an eternal student, a writer, and blogger owned by two cats, Ricky and Eccles. He is co-author with Miss Sharmishtha Basu of two published books, and solo author of three books on Amazon for Kindle, with a fourth book on the way.

He lives with his family and values his friends, family, and the flourishing and the well-being of his species in dangerous times.

He seeks one overarching goal: to help make the world a better place in his own tiny, drop-in the- ocean way, one piece of fractal artwork, essay, or story at a time. He battles the Forces of Darkness™ from his secret volcano lair in Virginia as Troythulu while his eldritch tentacled servitors from beyond time and space keep the lab in good condition.

He may be found online at:
https://kestalusrealm.wordpress.com
https://troythulu.blogspot.com
on Tumblr at https://troythulu.tumblr.com
and on Twitter, @Troythulu
His Amazon author page is at: https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy

Thursday Fun n Frolics 17.8.17 is for Karen S. Cole

THE RAINBOW HORIZON: A TALE OF GOOFY CHAOS

Karen talks about her book:
This 1980s’ satirical tale of the able-disabled Pacific Northwest features friendship favorably. It stars 3 Mexican Americans, one Black middle-class heroine, one Jewish Holocaust and two Vietnam War white survivors. It also hugs a conflicted gay male character. But it’s about a love triangle of 22s to 45s – with a roaring drunk Montanan! Racism is lampooned, sexism is promoted…viva endlessly.

It’s a rare, uniquely multicultural (white inclusive) and fetchingly gay humor novel by an experienced, published ghostwriter with 35 years in freelance writing, editing, marketing, publishing and serving others through working in-home for the Disabled. Also via Ghost Writer, Inc.: affordable book, screenplay, script, lyrics, copy, website and music ghostwriting. I’m mainly oriented towards commercial success, being a lifelong book ghostwriter and author. But I really want more distribution of the inmost concepts than I’m looking for accumulated sales of the book.
The story? Well, it’s a humorous ramble, kind of a smile a minute, that I’m still working on. I wanted to make sure there is a copy stored somewhere on the Internet, so you folks could review it. I also think this my universe is now evidently run by machines, not live personages. But the book is about dozens of People of Color, gay and transvestite and also white folks who congregate as extremely close friends, enemies and hot-minded lovers. They all live in the little town of Rama, WA — as in State of Washington, not the District of Columbia.

I have stayed in the Seattle area for decades, deciding to write a book about how everyone here technically lives within “the boonies” of Washington State, among plenty of giant, sprawling evergreen forests around here. Even in the City of Seattle, on the outskirts of the city proper. Beautiful deep woods you can barely view out your car windows, veering off into the far distance of a fading green light’s blacker depths. The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep…so far away you can only imagine touching them, or see the low-hanging silver clouds as mountains in your wildest dreams.

My book is strictly fiction, a lifetime of compiled stories about imaginary people, based on real life folks I hobnobbed with, while delicately generating its material. Everything is pretty much duly tongue in cheek, without pointing the fickle index finger at your face. It salutes and taunts those who are pretentious enough to use names instead of labels, who wrote many books before me as clams who never could get that the audience does indeed have a sense of humor, whatever their “ritual politics” are (or might not be).

As I sketched out the lengthy contents of this book, which after much experience will be markedly different upon a major rewrite, I found myself dreaming a dream. It involves somehow selling the book for cheap, spreading it around through word of mouth, and many lonesome readers getting a major kick out of my book’s non-racist, atypical stereo-funny contents. In Mexico, the United States, Canada and many other such places. I’m a feminist, I’ll admit it, and also a sexist who rides the line. Read this book if you like such a blend!

AGNIJASHATADALAMA PAYPAL AND PATREON- THE NEXT STEP by Sharmishtha Basu

Well, I finally decided that it will be but intelligent to create an online store for my works, that will help me in selling Agnijaat, Agnishatdal and my other creations in future.

Mostly you will see the sample books in agnijashatadalama, and announcements of my Amazon and Patreon projects, but, any sample book you see there, if you want to buy a pdf of its style (with far better contents) you know the email id to contact, or you can hop over to Patreon and become my patron there! That will be more trustworthy for you I believe. You will see me there every month with new works and I sincerely wish to see you too!!

So, here they are for you- just the foundations, if you feel like it suggest me, anything you want! If you want to display your books/works let me know. You know my email ids: sermistabasu@gmail.com and agnijaat@hotmail.com

now the urls of Agnijashatadalama:

https://agnijashatadalama.wordpress.com
https://agnijashatadalama.blogspot.in
https://www.facebook.com/agnijashatadalama

I will be waiting for your comments!
Wish me luck and join me there!

If you want to encourage the struggling artist and writer with your huge-hearted generosity:
https://www.paypal.me/sharmishthabasu
https://www.patreon.com/sharmishthabasu

You will be able to buy the Ezines, and my other digital works, some are already up in Patreon, will be there regularly- every month, others are available in Agnijashatadalama, where you can see the samples, directly approach me and I will send you the pdf files after you pay through paypal!

Troy Wednesdays 16.8.17 Chadameer

Chadameer

This post is for a version of the Chadameer species existing in the Gods of Terra setting. I’m also using them in a book collaboration with the prolific Sharmishtha Basu, which will be announced in detail once the book goes live online. Enjoy.

phonetic pronunciation: chhadəˈmēr
General Description:
A species of capriform humanoids, also known as “Fauns” to humanity, conquered and enslaved by the Dalazinnu Sodality as their chief scientists, engineers, technicians and emissaries to other species. Chadameer are bipedal, bimanual, and have an endothermic metabolism with a closed circulatory system and 2 two-chambered hearts. Chadameer are longlived, having almost twice the lifespan of a human, but mature slowly and have a low birthrate, restricting their numbers and under the present set of circumstances, a factor endangering their survival as a species. The beings are unimpressive, standing an average of 1.45 meters tall and massing less than 40 kilograms. The head is vaguely goatish, though with a large cranium and in both genders adorned with four horns and a short beard. The digitigrade legs end in four-toed hooves and are quite nimble. The arms end in hands with two fingers and two opposable thumbs. The body is covered with short fur ranging from whitish to almost black, generally in neutral tones, and the tail is thin and whiplike, used primarily for communicating emotional states. Chadameer have good hearing, exceptional depth-perception, and an excellent kinesthetic sense useful for climbing and balancing on uneven mountainous terrain. The species has eight lungs, several stomachs, and a unique geodesic rib structure that makes the torso more resistant to injury caused by blunt trauma.

Some Chadameer are telepathically gifted, and these are often genetically “tagged” with black and grey striped coats and silver beards, but are also frequently prone to recessive genetic traits.

Faun young are born sexless, but upon maturity assume either a male or female gender, apparently by choice, which they retain throughout their lives.

Chadameer typically wear robes, tabards, equipment harnesses, or nothing, and use hearing aids tuned to ultrasonic registers to permit them to hear everything their Dalazinnu masters say to them, question or command, to reduce the likelihood of beatings that come when orders are not heard by those spoken to.

Psychology:
Chadameer have eliminated aggressive traits from their psychology by altering their genome, rendering themselves incapable of intentional violence toward intelligent beings. The species has a paralyzing horror of space-flight because of a vague and ancient legend of “death from the stars,” of something that lives “out there, in the void between worlds.” This horror has never been named or otherwise specified, though all Chadameer legends refer to it in tales of those foolish enough to venture beyond the solid ground and skies of their homeworld. Terror of this “death” has been more than sufficient to keep the Fauns on their homeworld, reluctant enough to leave it as to cause them to go into a state of shock when forcibly removed by spacecraft. A few of the Fauns, in particular, those with unusual mental powers, are not afraid of space travel and indeed, are often addicted to the effects of Maelstrom travel, to the point of eagerly volunteering for off-world assignments at the behest of their masters. Such Chadameer are considered insane by their fellows and closely watched for signs of mental aberration. Many of them cannot properly care for themselves, but are still considered useful by the Dalazinnu, as they are frequently employed as interrogators, messengers and diplomatic agents when their masters deem it necessary to question or parley with aliens.

Society:
The Chadameer are children of a dying world, and themselves a dying race, due to their low birthrate, their abuse at the hands of the Dalazinnu, and the poisoning of the ecology by rampant industrialization and their masters’ initial bombardment of the planet before its conquest. The Dalazinnu consider the Fauns to be a disposable commodity, and are even now looking for another technically advanced, militarily vulnerable species to replace them when they become extinct.

An underground movement has arisen among the Fauns that seeks to reverse this trend, freeing their race from the yoke of their masters by genetically sabotaging the races they have uplifted for them, subtly altering them to turn on the Dalazinnu. This has already begun with such behavioral flaws in slave races as the killing rage of the Maktathuun when losses are taken, the tendency of the Tenebruuta for recklessness when bored, and even attempts to reengineer the genes for aggression back into their genome. So far, the Dalazinnu haven’t caught on just yet, but some of the brighter ones may become suspicious of their servants if the subversives play their hand too soon, which they just might as time for their species grows ever shorter.

Chadameer History:
The Chadameer removed their capacity for violent aggression and lowered their birthrate as a means of making them less likely to commit racial suicide by war or overpopulation. They also lost all desire to explore space, and technology with which to do it in the event that led to the legends of “death from the stars.” At some distant point in the past, they began to explore their home star system, and missions were sent to the other planets and moons. One such mission, however, brought back a strain of lethal microbial life to the homeworld that somehow survived the decontamination protocols, and a deadly plague swept across the planet, nearly destroying the Fauns until an antibiotic was developed to stop it. The social backlash was severe, resulting in a ban on space exploration, and the destruction of the remaining such technology, leading to the legends, and the “fear.” This was reenforced yet again, when their first sentient alien contact, the Dalazinnu, bombarded the planet, and took the Chadameer as a slave race, using them to create more slaves by cloning and uplift, and new weapons technologies to conquer still more territory.

Chadameer Telepaths:
These unusual individuals are considered to be both useful and dangerous. They are afflicted with a rare psychiatric disorder which is genetically cross-linked with such recessive traits as their distinctive grey and black striped coats. The psychotropic drugs used to treat their mental symptoms also serve as the catalyst that triggers and maintains their latent talents, especially telepathic ability, which makes them an asset to their Dalazinnu masters, who use them as gobetweens with aliens, whom the Dalazinnu are psychologically unable to relate to as anything but slaves or enemies in direct personal contact. These Chadameer are the first, and usually the only, Fauns met by most aliens, and are often led by a Dalazinnu master with an unusual gift for self-restraint. Without their drugs, these rare Chadameer are also without their powers as well as subject to rapid swings between fits of aggression and depression.

The Dalazinnu use them as their primary interspecies diplomats, when dealing with aliens in a nonviolent manner is absolutely necessary.

Troy David Loy is an eternal student, a writer, and blogger owned by two cats, Ricky and Eccles. He is co-author with Miss Sharmishtha Basu of two published books, and solo author of three books on Amazon for Kindle, with a fourth book on the way.

He lives with his family and values his friends, family, and the flourishing and the well-being of his species in dangerous times.

He seeks one overarching goal: to help make the world a better place in his own tiny, drop-in the- ocean way, one piece of fractal artwork, essay, or story at a time. He battles the Forces of Darkness™ from his secret volcano lair in Virginia as Troythulu while his eldritch tentacled servitors from beyond time and space keep the lab in good condition.

He may be found online at:
https://kestalusrealm.wordpress.com
https://troythulu.blogspot.com
on Tumblr at https://troythulu.tumblr.com
and on Twitter, @Troythulu
His Amazon author page is at: https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy

Some reviews on my Amazon books!

The document with links for the reviews, in case you want to dig in further!

https://agnijaat.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/2.docx

1.
New! Troy reviewed wildflowers in bed of rocks
Touching in its elegance January 18, 2017
A collection of sixty-nine poems, with such themes as love, beauty, and fantastic wonder, I found this book an excellent read on a cold winter’s night when the skies are clear, with the stars alight so very far away.
View on Amazon.com Add a comment View this book’s reviews on Amazon.com

2.
Troy reviewed durgapujo duti shishur duti jagat
The Bengali text is wonderful for my practice in reading the script June 1, 2016
In this, the same celebration seen through two different perspectives, I found the poetry quite pleasing to the mind’s ear. The Bengali text is wonderful for my practice in reading the script, as well as a good resource for practicing translating between it and English!
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3.
Troy reviewed barir pujo durgapuja and kalipuja
Excellent! June 1, 2016
As a big fan of things Indian, this collection of stories is not only informative in its depiction of Bengali worship celebrations, but I found the illustrations throughout with a charm evoking mystery and wonder!
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4.
F. E. Esparza reviewed The prisoner of Sand Castle
A Thinker December 27, 2015
I found this book to be interesting to read. The stories are very short and entertaining but I feel they don’t end properly as some feel like cliff hangers. I don’t know if that was the writers intention to do. On the flip side it does give a reader thoughts to ponder on what happen next. So I do have to say this book does make a reader think and captures a persons attention.
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5.
Troy reviewed myriad colours of earth
Beautiful stuff! September 9, 2015
I thoroughly enjoyed this one, with the lyrical feel of its verse, and the accompanying digital paintings that enhance it. Most excellent!
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6.
Troy reviewed of dreams and reality
This is stellar! September 9, 2015
This one evokes thoughts like a those of a mind lost between misty puffs of down in the sky, reaching for, but always out of grasp, of answers to the very deepest of questions. Well done!
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7.
Troy reviewed the heart beats on
Fascinating stuff! September 9, 2015
A collection of poetic verse and digital painting, this book was well worth an evening’s read. Congratulations to the authoress to work done well!
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8.
Troy reviewed Meghparir Gaan song of clouds
Wonderful! September 9, 2015
As a collection of poems both Bengali and English by the authoress and her own art, this made my thoughts soar to realms afar, captured perfectly in graceful script and color!
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9.
Troy reviewed Butterflies from life’s garden
Wonderful! July 5, 2015
This collection of verse got me thinking about those little questions of life that seem so difficult to articulate in words, yet whose answers can be deceptively simple once properly considered. They are butterflies of thought, flitting about the mind’s eye and avoiding one’s direct gaze until viewed out of the corners, as it were, of that same mind’s eye. Great stuff!
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10.
Troy reviewed waves that became songs
I enjoyed this! July 5, 2015
As a collection of poems, this one was a pleasure to read through, while taking in the authoress’s evocative imagery, which supplemented the text wonderfully!
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11.
Troy reviewed Moments from the journey
Awesome poetry! July 5, 2015
This is a brilliant collection, with lively and enchanting images that add a great deal of color and feel to the text.
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12.
Troy reviewed Serenade of brush and quill: colours and words waltz
Very good! May 16, 2015
This is a wonderful collection of seven line poems, and made an excellent late night first reading. This does not disappoint!
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13.
Troy reviewed For Tagore – rabikare agnishatdal
This is so cool! May 12, 2015
I love that, not only is this a book of poetry and evocative imagery, but also that it’s written in two languages, including one I’m learning while still a novice.

I must thank the authoress for this wonderful learning opportunity, and a fitting tribute to the great Bengali polymath himself!
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14.
Kevin Cooper reviewed spirits of darkness and light
Sharmishtha’s stories are captivating. Her characters although purely original … May 6, 2015
Sharmishtha’s stories are captivating. Her characters although purely original bring some of India’s mythological creatures to light with a style of writing that can only be attributed to that of a true mistress of story-telling. Nothing is what it seems as each incredible tale keeps you wondering what is going to happen next with endings that are in no way predictable. A thoroughly enjoyable read!
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15.
Troy reviewed The prisoner of Sand Castle
Enchanting! April 30, 2015
This is an excellent collection of short fiction with cool Indian themes. I’ve always enjoyed Ms. Basu’s paranormal fiction, and this is no exception! My favorites from this are the collection’s titular story, a chilling piece titled Scarecrow, and The Woman in White, of strange goings on in a nightspot. Three thumbs up!
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16.
Gayle Walters Rose reviewed The charons: the ferrymen to hell
Evil pitted against an innocent March 29, 2015
This is a gripping tale that pits evil against the innocent. The story begins with the cruelty that our own family members can sometimes inflict on us and continues with a vindictiveness that sees no end as road blocks and terrorism are used to take down an innocent human being. And as unbelievable as it may appear, this scenario is being played out with many other innocents worldwide as those in power try to take down and…Read More

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17.
Troy reviewed The charons: the ferrymen to hell
Another good one! March 11, 2015
I’ve been following Ms. Sharmishtha Basu’s blogs and writings for some years now, and I’ve just finished reading this. It is perhaps the grimmest story I’ve read in a while. It’s dark realism is different in both style, outlook, and execution from the paranormal fiction she also writes. A story of life in India, it does not paint a pretty picture, but offers a warning, along with the discoveries and hard-fought lessons of the…Read More

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18.
David Stewart reviewed The charons: the ferrymen to hell
This is a great story of senseless malevolence and the petty cruelty that … February 15, 2015
This is a great story of senseless malevolence and the petty cruelty that people can inflict on each other. It’s an interesting look into the culture of family relationships and business dealings where everyone is out to get you.
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19.
Troy reviewed A bouquet of wild flowers
Thought provoking! February 1, 2015
A collection of 70 poems, this is an insightful work by Ms. Basu. If I must choose favorites among these, they would be her verses ‘Heaven or Hell’ and ‘Change your ways India.’ Good stuff to warm a Winter’s night!
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20.
Troy reviewed spirits of darkness and light
A good read, be it a dark night or brightly lit afternoon! January 14, 2015
Ms. Basu has in this book, a compelling portrayal of supernatural beings both benign and malignant. Here, she shows her skill in writing tales on the paranormal beings of India and the mortal characters who interact with these creatures as well. Very enjoyable!
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21.
David Stewart reviewed The Lotus of Fire
Five Stars January 12, 2015
This is a great little book with great poems and wonderful illustrations.
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22.
Teagan reviewed Serenade of brush and quill: colours and words waltz
Five Stars January 7, 2015
What a treat to have this at such a great price!
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23.
Teagan reviewed The Lotus of Fire
Lovingly Crafted December 14, 2014
This book of poetry and illustrations is lovingly crafted, and the contents are imbued with it. Kudos to the valiant spirit of this author/illustrator for getting her work out there and learning about indie publishing.
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24.
Troy reviewed Tell me a story
1 of 1 people found the following helpful
Great collection! December 8, 2014
This is a terrific compilation of micro-fiction, featuring a wonderful mixture of genres and skillfully done as well. This is one of Ms. Basu’s works that showcases her considerable talent as an authoress!
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25.
Troy reviewed songbird sings to sun
Wonderful! November 23, 2014
This is a wondrous collection of seven-line poems! Ever since reading Ms. Basu’s many blogs over the last few years, she has shown herself to be a woman of astounding energy and vibrant imagination, and it shows in her considerable ability as a published authoress, and this work is no exception!
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26.
Troy reviewed black mist and other stories
Brilliant stories! October 31, 2014
Perfect for Halloween reading! I love the way the author has with so many different genres of dark fiction! I must say, these are good!
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27.
Brieuc Martin-Onraet reviewed The Lotus of Fire
1 of 1 people found the following helpful
Great work! October 24, 2014
Lovely texts and art. Great work!
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28.
Troy reviewed The Lotus of Fire
2 of 2 people found the following helpful
Excellent work! October 11, 2014
This is a wonderful collection of musings, and a wonderful collection of insights into Indian culture, life, belief, and love. It would be interesting to see it also in Bengali language and script to practice translations on in study. Just beautiful!
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