Posted in "1 my books, artworks and stuffs"

Agnishatdal Book 13, Durgapuja 1427, Pat Ritter critique by SB

Agnishatdal Book 13, Durgapuja 2020
Pat Ritter
( https://shoptly.com/sharmishthabasu )
https://gumroad.com/sharmishthabasu
Critique by SB

Agnishatdal Book 13 (Durgapuja 1427) Pat Ritter
https://gumroad.com/l/EcyaD
https://shoptly.com/i/bv2y

Agnishatdal book 13 Shares works of Pat Ritter, his stories revolve around Australian outback. Before I started reading his works all I knew about Australia were its wildlife, I had no clue that they too had their cowboys or sheep-boys to be more precise! These stories are thoroughly enjoyable.

There are first chapters of his books in the book, check out the full books in his site https://www.patritter.com.au , encourage this extra-ordinary author! After all if you guys won’t buy our books from where will be get the enthusiasm to write more? Pick up a few of his books!

Click goes the shears: Very well written piece set in the shearer strike era of Australia, how a young couple and a rebel get stuck in the turmoil and the way it affected them narrated through a very well-written piece.

The full book is here

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/497192

The drover : I rather enjoyed this piece, the bonding of a father and his daughter. The tough and challenging life of the father as a young boy and his encounter with a ghost! The cherry on the pie! Very well-written piece again!

The full story is here:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/95766

The shearer: The story of another drover. A glimpse into his rowdy life when he runs into trouble with folks in bar and ends up in jail for a night! Quite well written!

The full story is here:

SMASHWORDS: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/395642
AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HR5E8QI/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i5

Tilbaroo Station: This story is so sweet, warm and romantic. A newlywed couple very much in life are about to start their new life together in a nice piece of property gifted by the girl’s father on their wedding. They are so much in love!

The full story:

Available ebook formats: epub mobi pdf lrf pdb txt html
Buying Link: http://www.patritter.com.au/
Tilbaroo Station
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/681247

The year that never was: This one sounds another part of Tilbaroo Station, the future of the newlyweds we have met in Tilbaroo station, the couple shares their memories of a rough year they have passed when extreme drought struck their land.

The full story:

TO PURCHASE THIS BOOK: CLICK ONTO THESE LINKS: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/758644.

Posted in "1 my books, artworks and stuffs"

Agnishatdal Book 13, Durgapuja 1427, Pat Ritter critique by Labanya

Agnishatdal Book 13, Durgapuja 2020
Pat Ritter
( https://shoptly.com/sharmishthabasu )
https://gumroad.com/sharmishthabasu
Critique by Labanya

Agnishatdal Book 13 (Durgapuja 1427)
https://gumroad.com/l/EcyaD
https://shoptly.com/i/bv2y

Agnishatdal book 13 Shares works of Mr. Pat Ritter, extremely talented Australian author. I really enjoy his writings. They are opening up an absolutely unknown world to me, Australia rural.

There are first chapters of his books in the book, check out the full books in his site https://www.patritter.com.au , encourage this extra-ordinary author!

Click goes the shears: It is the story of Joe and Hanna or so it seems, stuck in the turmoil created by strike of shearers, shearers are people who picked wool from sheep. The story has just begun, it is first chapter and very well written piece!

The full book is here

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/497192

The drover : The drover are those who transported herds of sheep from one place to other. This one is the beginning of the story of Harry, a boy who loved his job and shone well, the story is very interesting.

The full story is here:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/95766

The shearer: It is the story of another drover, sounds interesting till the end. The thing I love most about these stories is the glimpse they give in Australian past, something we don’t see anywhere else.

The full story is here:

SMASHWORDS: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/395642
AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HR5E8QI/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i5

Tilbaroo Station: A cute and heartwarming beginning of a newlywed in old era in Australian outback, they have been gifted a lucrative property by the bride’s father to build their world. Loved the warmth and tenderness of the story!

The full story:

Available ebook formats: epub mobi pdf lrf pdb txt html
Buying Link: http://www.patritter.com.au/
Tilbaroo Station
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/681247

The year that never was: This seems another chapter from the newlyweds of Tilbaroo station, revolving around a challenging year when drought struck hard Australian outback, the couple taking a walk down the memory lane!

The full story:

TO PURCHASE THIS BOOK: CLICK ONTO THESE LINKS: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/758644.

Posted in "1 my books, artworks and stuffs"

Agnishatdal Book 13, Durgapuja 1427, Pat Ritter

Agnishatdal Book 13, Durgapuja 1427, 2020
https://gumroad.com/l/EcyaD
https://shoptly.com/i/bv2y

This quarterly is sharing some works of Pat Ritter, a cherished creator of Agnishatdal, his writings are about a brand new thing to many of us, rural Australia.

I have read his works and absolutely loved his way of writing and his topic has taken me to a trip to a land I knew very little about before reading these works.

Agnishatdal you know is a monthly English Ezine created by a group of amazing people scattered all over the world, they create as per their whim so their creations are unpredictable and awesome! You will have to read the books to understand fully.

You know that these works are copyrighted to Pat Ritter.

Do let Pat Ritter and me know your opinion of the book.

Love.
Sharmishtha Basu
30.10.20

Posted in "1 my books, artworks and stuffs"

Agnishatdal Book 13, Durgapuja 1427, Pat Ritter

Agnishatdal Book 13, Durgapuja 1427, 2020
https://gumroad.com/l/EcyaD
https://shoptly.com/i/bv2y

This quarterly is sharing some works of Pat Ritter, a cherished creator of Agnishatdal, his writings are about a brand new thing to many of us, rural Australia.

I have read his works and absolutely loved his way of writing and his topic has taken me to a trip to a land I knew very little about before reading these works.

Agnishatdal you know is a monthly English Ezine created by a group of amazing people scattered all over the world, they create as per their whim so their creations are unpredictable and awesome! You will have to read the books to understand fully.

You know that these works are copyrighted to Pat Ritter.

Do let Pat Ritter and me know your opinion of the book.

Love.
Sharmishtha Basu
30.10.20

Posted in Author Desk Mondays

his life worth living by Pat Ritter

His life worth living

Every adversity carries with it the seed of an equivalent or greater benefit.
≈ Napoleon Hill ≈

Courage, determination, independence are some of the words to describe George Burtenshaw. His passing, aged one hundred and two years and a half truly showed inspiration with such self-determination, willpower and a ‘what he wanted attitude’ combined with a deep love for his huge family.

Born in 1911 at Newport Wales at seven years old his home destroyed by bombs at the close of World War 1. His family taken. He with his sister Lou taken to a Children’s Home. Alone with only his sister, he had no knowledge where his brothers and parents were. His life in a Children’s Home proceeded until his fifteenth birthday when he applied through Church of England, Council of Empire Settlement to go to Canada. Instead he ended up in Australia.

His arrival in Australia with four shillings to begin a new life, a job with a place to live in a new country and close to the town Gympie. His work ethics proved how important his life became. Aged eighteen years old, beginning of the Great Depression, he travelled by train to Rockhampton to seek work. Unable to find work he purchased a bicycle for seven shillings and sixpence leaving him little money. Four days riding along the beach, sleeping under a sheet of canvas returned to Kia Ora to be welcomed.

George worked for his old boss when a family arrived to share farm the property. Must had been ‘love at first sight’ because this family’s daughter Eva caught George’s eye. Eva later became his wife and they celebrated their sixty-fifth wedding anniversary before she sadly passed aged ninety-six years old.

Having worked his apprecenticeship at a dairy farm he purchased a motor cycle journeyed west to find work. By 1942 World War 11 exploded across the globe. George enlisted. Before going to war he married Eva. Twelve months after leaving Australian shores for Mayala Japanese invaded Singapore. He became a Prisoner-of-War and incarcerated in Changi Prison until World War 11 ended.

He recorded a daily record in a series of war diaries. If his captors found these diaries he would have been decapitated. He concealed them in plastic and safe from the enemy. When reading this portion of the book one cannot help but wonder at the suffering and atrocities Prisoners-of-War suffered at the hands of their enemy.

After such an horrific time in his life, he returned to Australia. Eva nursed him back to health. George went on to live a life worth living.

At 10am on Thursday 13 September 2007 George attended a DEDICATION OF COMMEMORATIVE PLAQUE to recognise the sacrifice and service of the members of 2/10th Australian Field Regiment 8th Division, Australian Imperial Force conducted at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra when at last he was recognised for his time as a Prisoner Of War.

George has certainly proven the words spoken by Napoleon Hill – Every adversity carries with it the seed of an equivalent or greater benefit. This is truly an inspirational story of survival mixed with self-determination with his life worth living.

Available ebook formats: epub mobi pdf rtf lrf pdb txt html
Buying Link: http://www.patritter.com.au/

His life worht living
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/591980

Posted in Author Desk Mondays

Pat Ritter for you!

Read Pat Ritter’s Smashwords Interview

Interview with Pat Ritter

Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
My teenage years were in Sandgate, a seaside suburb of Brisbane the capital city of Queensland Australia. In sub-junior I attended Sandgate High School. A teacher, Mr Imoff, our English Teacher after we wrote a composition approached me and said, ‘you have a gift for writing – you write the way you speak which is unique’. Unfortunately at the time I never had any idea of what he meant.

Again later in my life when I attended college a lecturer told me exactly the same words. I didn’t truly understand what he meant. However, with this lecturer we wrote and published my first book ‘Closing The Gap’ which started my journey of becoming an author.

When did you first start writing?
In 1986. At the time I attended college – my lecturer, Bob O’Sullivan took notice of a project I began when I used material from his lecture in this project. I was a police officer. In the area I patrolled, a number of teenagers ‘ran away from home’ and I didn’t have the skills nor the knowledge of stopping them. Bob lectured in a subject ‘Behaviour’ which gave me these skills and knowledge and soon after I developed this knowledge to help parents improve their communication with their teenage child. This project was an instant success. Bob suggested we write and publish a book about what I was doing in the community. He wrote the theory whilst I wrote the actual case studies of each parent-child interview.

What motivated you to become an indie author?
Before 2009 I self-published books and sold them via my website using mailing coupons. When Mark Coker introduced me to Smashwords I immediately commenced to publish my books as ebooks and became an indie author. Since 2009 – the rest is history. I love it. All I need to do now is to write, publish, market and sell.

How has Smashwords contributed to your success?
Greatly. Daily I check for downloads, site updates. On one of these occasions Mark wrote about an author in America earning six figures annually selling ebooks on Smashwords. I read this person’s website and immediately followed his advise.

What is the greatest joy of writing for you?
Reading feedback from my readers. Who would think I sit here at Brooloo in Queensland at my computer and communicate with authors across the other side of the world. It’s as if we sit across from one another. I love to write – I write each day. I belong to a writers group which meet weekly.

What do your fans mean to you?
Greatest! There is no better feeling when I receive feedback or read a review from one of my books. A couple of years ago I wrote and published ‘The Drover’ which has been a huge success. I still pinch myself to think people from across the globe love reading this book.

What inspires you to get out of bed each day?
Knowing I want to write. I write a novel per year and a 500 word story weekly. Research takes much of my time to ‘get things right’. I love to write.

When you’re not writing, how do you spend your time?
Watch television. Read. Take care of my property. Travel.

How do you discover the ebooks you read?
Using Smashwords, Amazon, Facebook and my website http://www.patritter.com.au

Do you remember the first story you ever wrote?
Yes – in grade four. The exercise to write was about describing a scene. I wrote a letter to my grandmother to tell her what I was doing. It was read to the class to my embarrassment.

What is your writing process?
I write whatever comes into my mind. I’m lucky I live in the country without any interruptions or neighbours. Bush is all around me. Before I write a chapter I see and act out the scene of what I’m about to write. For instance in my latest novel I have a scene where Joe leaves the place he loves. Each step of the process goes through my mind before I write then I write the scene. I write daily.

Do you remember the first story you ever read, and the impact it had on you?
Yes – it was a story of an aboriginal boy who is saved by a sailor shipwrecked on a reef. Only a couple of years ago I purchased this book at a sale and re-read it. Memory flooded back of the joy I had when first reading this book.

How do you approach cover design?
I have a professional designer in America. Melissa does a wonderful job.

What are your five favorite books, and why?
These change from time to time. Once I read probably two books per year but since I’ve taken my writing seriously I am an avid reader. I can’t say I have favourite books because now I read up to possibly two to three books per week. I am amazed at some of the indie authors which in my opinion are some of the best in the world. With ebooks – if I don’t like the author, I delete them and read the next book. If the book doesn’t catch my attendion in the first few pages than I go to the next one. That’s how it is in todays environment.

What do you read for pleasure?
Mainly western, Australian, romance and at times crime depending on the storyline.

What is your e-reading device of choice?
Kindle.

What book marketing techniques have been most effective for you?
Smashwords, Amazon and Facebook.

Posted in Author Desk Mondays

Tillbaroo Station by Pat Ritter

Tilbaroo Station

Available ebook formats: epub mobi pdf lrf pdb txt html
Buying Link: http://www.patritter.com.au/
Tilbaroo Station
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/681247

Story Thus Far:

‘The Shearer’:
‘The Shearer’ is the first book in this series. Set in 1891 at the scene of ‘The Great Shearers Strike’. Major character Joe Ryan. Joe fought for better working conditions and wages for his fellow shearers. Along the way he fell in love with Hannah Young, a grazier’s daughter.

During 1890 Christmas Dinner with Hannah’s parents, her landlady Ma, and Hannah’s grandmother discovered they are sisters separated when Ma aged ten, Hannah’s grandmother at birth. First time they’ve met since being separated.

1891 Joe Ryan met his friend Joe Gibson, a fellow shearer to help fight for better working conditions and wages.

During the strike, graziers wouldn’t permit ‘striking shearers’ to shear their sheep. Contracted shearers were those who held a ‘non-union ticket to shear’ only hired by graziers. Joe Gibson held this ticket.

At the height of ‘Great Shearers Strike of 1891’ Joe Ryan gathered his shearers to strike on the outskirts of Cunnamulla. Four months they survived until police intervened to stop the strike. Joe Gibson met his friend Joe Ryan on the final day at the strike camp before police arrived. They exchanged clothing plus personal items. Joe Gibson took Joe Ryan’s place. They changed identities.

‘Click Go The Shears’:

‘Click Go The Shears’ is the second book in this series. Follow-on from ‘The Shearer’. Joe Ryan who has the identity of Joe Gibson escapes capture whilst Joe Gibson takes the place of Joe Ryan to be tried for leading the strikers. Thirteen strikers appeared in court, sentenced to three years imprisonment for their part. Joe Ryan (Gibson) serves his imprisonment at St Helen Island Prison in Moreton Bay.

At the end of his prison term both Joe’s meet at Barcaldine (original town where strike occurred) to return to their own identities. Joe Gibson returned to Cunnamulla to eventually meet Hannah who still resided with Ma at her boarding house. Joe and Hannah fell in love. They marry. Hannah’s father gifts his property ‘Tilbaroo Station’ to them as their wedding gift. The story continues:

‘Tilbaroo Station’

‘Tilbaroo Station’ is the third book in this series. Read on to follow the lives of Joe and Hannah: